Two Frustrations With the Data Science Industry

I saw some serious BS about data science on LinkedIn last night. This is nothing new, but this time I couldn’t help myself. I went on a small rant:

I don’t give a shit if you call yourself a data scientist, an analyst, a machine learning practitioner, an operations research specialist, a data engineer, a modeler, a statistician, a code poet, or a squirrel. I don’t care if you have a PhD, if you went to MIT or a community college, if you were born on a farm or in a city, or if Andrew Ng DMs you for tips. I want to know what you can do, if you can share, if you can learn, if you can listen, and if you can stand for what is right even if it’s unpopular. If we’re good there, the rest we can figure out together.

I must have tapped into something, so I’d like to myself a bit more thoroughly.

My rant is rooted in two frustrations about data science.

My first frustration relates to overclassification. How many different terms can we use to refer to data scientists? I honestly don’t know. I have it on authority that there are six types of data scientists. No, wait, there are seven. Strike that, eight. Actually there are ten. Stop the insanity!

Susan-Powter-image

The industry itself is also subject to this kind of sillified stratification. I don’t know what the hell I do anymore. Is it operations research? Statistics? Analytics? Machine Learning? Artificial Intelligence? All of it? It depends which thought leadership piece I read. And what is the current state of this field, anyway? Are we in the age of Analytics 2.0? Or is it 3.0? Is big data saving the world, or is it the “trough of disillusionment”? I find all of this unhelpful.

Why is this happening? The use of computer models to learn from data has been around for at least five decades now, but data science has moved from an unnamed, specialized backwater into a rapidly growing and vital industry. This growth has created a market for teaching others about this hot new field. It has also led to the organization of a hierarchy of those who are “in the know” and those who are not. These are the factors driving the accelerating creation of labels and classifications.

However, knowing the names of things does not constitute understanding of essence; the proliferation of labels under the banner of “thought leadership” is often a gimmick; and as Martin Gardner said, inventing your own terminology is a sign of a crank. Debates about terminology often draw us away from doing good data science. Maybe it’s just me but sometimes I get the feeling these distractions are on purpose. They don’t help anyone solve any problems, that’s for sure.

The second frustration I have is overreliance on credentials. As opposed to academic or research positions, my own work in industry has been focused on the practical use of data science to address business problems. More often than not, I’ve worked as part of a team to get the job done. What matters for people like me is whether problems actually get solved, in a reasonable amount of time with a reasonable amount of expense.

I have encountered situations where employers would only consider applicants who had graduated from certain schools, or with certain degrees, or with a certain number of years of experience with a certain specific technical skill. All of these qualifications are proxies for what actually matters: whether someone can meaningfully contribute to team-based analytical problem solving. Focusing on proxies results in both Type I and Type II errors: hiring scientists with great credentials but an inability to deliver (“all hat and no cattle“), or even worse, missing out on the opportunity to hire the proverbial “unicorn” because they didn’t tick the right box. I’ve seen both happen. These proxies are not without their uses: if I really require the development of an MINLP solver to solve optimization models with a particular structure…the right candidate very likely has a PhD. The point is not to confuse correlation with causation. Having a PhD does not make me a great data scientist. Nor does github, nor Coursera, nor Kaggle points. We need to dig deeper.

I suppose I should end positively. The last part of my rant was an appeal to inclusiveness and an appeal to pragmatism. Practical data science means making tradeoffs, large and small, every single day. It means seeing the big picture but also being willing to dig into the details. Let’s take this same practical mindset in growing our skills and building our teams.

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Author: natebrix

Follow me on twitter at @natebrix.

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